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Blacksmith Techniques — Making A Basic Wall Hook

Blacksmith Techniques — Making A Basic Wall Hook

This video comes from eCountryLifestyle.com and is part of their "Country Creations Webinar Series". It features blacksmith Bill Pevey in the workshops of the Craftmen's Guild of Mississippi. Bill first became interested in blacksmithing about nine years ago and has been heavily involved since then, primarily with the Mississippi Forge Council. Members of both organizations hail from all over America. The Mississippi Forge Council also teach blacksmithing classes at the Craft Center. Bill explains that the blacksmith once made everything that was made from iron and steel, including cutlery, pots and pans, nails, tools, stirrups and countless other items. He shows us a broad axe and tells us how it was used to shape and square up the beams used for houses, barns, shipbuilding and other large structures. The axe head itself was hand made by a blacksmith many years ago. Bill then gives us a demonstration on how to make a simple wall hook from square steel bar. He explains that the bar will be drawn out to a taper, cut, twisted and then bent to shape by using basic blacksmithing techniques. Bituminous coal is used in the forge. Once the impurities have burned off the blacksmith is left
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Wooden Bowl Making With Columbus Woodturner Devon Palmer

Wooden Bowl Making With Columbus Woodturner Devon Palmer

Video Rating: 4 / 5 Devon Palmer is a Woodturner based in Columbus, Ohio, who specializes in wooden bowls and vases made from reclaimed urban forest trees which have fallen down or have had to be felled for one reason or another. Devon says that he tries to avoid using living trees wherever possible, and prefers to recycle "yard waste" for instance. Typically Devon will use the trunk section out of the tree as they tend to be more "balanced" and not have as much "reaction wood" as other parts of the tree. He rough cuts the pieces so that they end up looking a bit like a "stop" sign, and does not worry about leaving the bark on in most cases. He then drills a hole in the center and mounts the piece to his lathe faceplate. Devon first uses a gouge to rough out and balance the piece of wood in the lathe. Bark and wood chips fly everywhere as the bowl begins to take shape. Admiring the contrast between the sapwood and the heartwood, Devon tries to leave as much of it on the finished bowl as possible. Once the piece has been properly balanced the shaping
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How It’s Made — Traditional Asiatic Composite Hunting Bows

How It’s Made — Traditional Asiatic Composite Hunting Bows

Video Rating: four / five This video is an excerpt from The Discovery Channel's "How It's Made" program on "Traditional Bows" and featuring bowmaker Rodney Wright. There are a number of very sexy looking finished bows shown, including several laminated from contrasting pieces of timber. I have to say I'm a sucker for contrasting woods -- no matter what the item is -- so I enjoyed watching this rather slick video. The video begins by explaining that, with the invention of the bow and arrow, mankind transformed into efficient hunter gatherers. Nowadays, with the subsequent invention of supermarkets and commerce in Western society, the need for hunting one's own food is no longer a requirement. However there are still plenty of people who use bows for recreation -- whether it be for hunting or participating in archery competitions. The program shows the basic construction of a longbow, made from six laminations of cherry wood. While not exactly the traditional way to make an English-style longbow it is, nonetheless, an effective method -- especially when it comes to Asiatic-style bows. A composite bow is a bow made from two or more different materials laminated together and held under tension. The different
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Violin Making — Where And How To Start If You Want To Make Violins?

Violin Making — Where And How To Start If You Want To Make Violins?

It has been said that violinmaking is often a combination of wood working, music, chemistry, geometry, business enterprise and fine art. While there may be some truth to that for some people it is much, much more. For instance, while you may want to make violins for a living, quite possibly you are just interested in trying a different type of hobby from what most other people are doing? A violin is primarily constructed of timber and a specialist violin maker is known as a luthier. Each and every piece of timber vibrates in a different way. The spruce top is known the sounding board or belly. Spruce is by and large considered to the be the most ideal and effective material for the sounding board of most of the stringed musical instruments that are made. It is the material of choice for sounding boards for the piano, harpsichord, classical or acoustic guitar, lute, and so on. Every section of spruce vibrates in different ways. The sides, back and neck are manufactured from maple. Maple is actually a harder timber compared to the spuce and the hardness, combined with the shape and construction of the violin, helps to determine the
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Dry Stone Walling Demonstration At The 2008 Heritage Skills Fair, Gibside

Dry Stone Walling Demonstration At The 2008 Heritage Skills Fair, Gibside

Here is a demonstration of dry stone walling done at the 2008 Heritage Skills Fair in Gibside and it seems appropriate to have it on this particular site (even though we have nothing to do with the Heritage Skills Fair). In the video the viewer will see the various construction methods that are used in making a dry-stone wall. The wall is profiled like an "A", being roughly twice as thick at the bottom than it is at the top. There are actually two layers of stones which, in effect, form two separate walls, with hearting stones, rubble or even earth in the middle. The hearting helps to lock the two walls together. Once the wall is about knee height a series of large stones are placed on top. These are known as "throughstones" and they help to tie the two walls together at that height. When you get above that you need to make sure that the next stone across is the same height so that it can tie the throughstone to the walls at either side of the through stone. Sometimes the throughstones jut out on either side of the wall and some people might think that they
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Blacksmithing Workshop — Forge Welding A Decorative Metal Branch

Blacksmithing Workshop — Forge Welding A Decorative Metal Branch

Video Rating: four / 5 Mark Aspery is a European journeyman blacksmith from Springville California who owns and operates the Mark Aspery School of Blacksmithing. Mark is also an Associate of the Worshipful Company of Blacksmiths (A.W.C.B.) which was originally established by Edward II as a blacksmiths guild in the U.K. way back in 1325. Becoming interested in metalworking as a high school student in 1974 he eventually landed a job as a blacksmith with Charles Watts and Sons in Rugby, U.K. He soon found out that making metal move and then being able to control that movement were two very separate skills and, only after acquiring the necessary skills, he considered himself an artist, primarily favoring both Art Nouveau and Craftsman Styles. He soon became fluid in other styles of metalworking, mainly depending on other smiths that he worked with over the years. Some of them were organic in design while others were more stylized. During this time he was also exposed to non-ferrous metals such as copper and bronze. Mark has since gone on to write two books and is working on a third. The two published books are "Mastering The Fundamentals Of Blacksmithing" and "Mastering The Fundamentals
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18th Century Acadian Basket Making At Fortress Louisbourg

18th Century Acadian Basket Making At Fortress Louisbourg

This video demonstrates the vanishing art of basket making in the Acadian tradition and teaches the unique style of weaving through step-by-step processes. Acadian, Black, and Mi'kmaq styles overlap and influence each other, and these baskets have been created over many centuries by the Acadians. As can be seen here, the art is currently practiced by historical interpreter craftswomen at Fortress Louisbourg in Cape Breton Nova Scotia. In 1713 the French came to Louisbourg after ceding Acadia and Newfoundland to the British by the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht. This treaty ended the War of the Spanish Succession. Basket weaving is the process of weaving unspun vegetable fibers into a basket or other similar form. Basket makers often will use a variety of fibrous or pliable materials and almost anything that will bend or form a shape can be used. some examples include various grasses, pine straw, animal hair, hide, thread or twine, and wood. In this video the women use green pussy willow as their material of choice. The bark is removed through boiling, and the willow will take about three days of soaking to make it nice and pliable. The original natives of the area around Louisbourg
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Chairmaking Workshop – From Cherry Log To Country Chair

Chairmaking Workshop – From Cherry Log To Country Chair

As the title suggests, here is the making of a Chair from a log to the completed item. Filmed on location and in black and white by chairmaker Antoni Ross, this video demonstrates the simple, yet effective, methods used in bringing a piece of furniture to life using basic tools such as the froe, axe and draw knife. The section of log comes from a tree felled only hours before. First, a froe and maul (or mallet) are used to split the log for the necessary materials, such as legs, spindles and back slats. Splitting the wood in this way helps to relieve the stresses which have built up in the tree as it grew and, as a result, there is less warpage of the finished pieces. Some of these pieces are then cleaned up and rough-shaped using a small side axe or hatchet, before proceeding to the shave horse to be fine tuned with a draw knife. It is especially nice to see the wooden spindles being rounded to shape in this manner. The dumphead (the hold down or clamp) holds one end of the spindle while the free end can be shaped with the draw knife. Whittling with
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Coopering At Four Wind Vineyard

Coopering At Four Wind Vineyard

At one stage, at almost every town, village and roadside stop in the world one would find a cooper or three. These craftsmen -- as they were always men or boys in those days -- were entrusted to make sure the stocks of grain, meat, fish, wine, fruit and other perishables were kept safe from harms way. Likewise it was important to have at least one cooper on board of the many wooden ships which sailed around the globe. Used for the past 2000 years or so, wooden casks protected food, wine, gold coins, nails, chains and ropes and other goods from rodents, insects, the elements and, in some cases, even humans! The people responsible for making and maintaining these casks were known as coopers, and there were two main types of coopering involved. The first was wet coopering, which included the watertight casks made to hold liquids such as wines, water and oils. These casks would be heavy and made from oak staves, bound together by iron hoops. Each stave would be set tight with the one next to it. When the liquid was added to the inside of the finished cask the fibers of the timber staves would
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